How Does Experimental Design Modify the Result of Daphnia magna Heartbeat Rate Test? ─ Analyses of Factors Affecting the Sensitivity of the Test System

  • Ildikó Fekete-Kertész Department of Applied Biotechnology and Food Science, Faculty of Chemical Technology and Biotechnology, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Hungary
  • Tamás Stirling Department of Applied Biotechnology and Food Science, Faculty of Chemical Technology and Biotechnology, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Hungary
  • Orsolya Ullmann Department of Applied Biotechnology and Food Science, Faculty of Chemical Technology and Biotechnology, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Hungary
  • Éva Farkas Department of Applied Biotechnology and Food Science, Faculty of Chemical Technology and Biotechnology, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Hungary
  • Csaba Kirchkeszner Department of Applied Biotechnology and Food Science, Faculty of Chemical Technology and Biotechnology, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Hungary
  • Viktória Feigl Department of Applied Biotechnology and Food Science, Faculty of Chemical Technology and Biotechnology, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Hungary
  • Mónika Molnár Department of Applied Biotechnology and Food Science, Faculty of Chemical Technology and Biotechnology, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Hungary

Abstract

Development of an unconventional test method involves usually the comparison of biological responses under a variety of test conditions. The quality of these biological methods relies on an appropriate experimental design. The Daphnia magna heartbeat rate as a physiological endpoint for assessing aquatic pollution has been of minor interest so far; nonetheless, this could be an early and sensitive indicator of the harmful effect of micropollutants. Our aim was to set up the optimal experimental design of the heartbeat rate test. The studied factors were the composition of the test medium, the age of the test organism, and the exposure time, at triclosan concentrations between 0.2–2000 μg/L. According to the evaluation of test results the optimal test condition for the heartbeat rate test assumes tap water as test medium, 10-day-old test organisms and 48 h exposure time.

Keywords

Daphnia magna, heartbeat rate, micropollutants, triclosan
Published in Onlinefirst
31-08-2017
How to Cite
FEKETE-KERTÉSZ, Ildikó et al. How Does Experimental Design Modify the Result of Daphnia magna Heartbeat Rate Test? ─ Analyses of Factors Affecting the Sensitivity of the Test System. Periodica Polytechnica Chemical Engineering, [S.l.], 2017. ISSN 1587-3765. Available at: <https://pp.bme.hu/ch/article/view/10841>. Date accessed: 21 nov. 2017. doi: https://doi.org/10.3311/PPch.10841.
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Articles